Afghanistan mess is Biden’s disaster and other commentary

Afghanistan mess is Biden's disaster and other commentary


White House watch: It’s Biden’s Disaster

“The American people broadly agreed with” President Biden’s “decision to end the war in Afghanistan,” and it was his predecessor “who did the deal with the Taliban for a full American withdrawal,” but “none of that absolves Biden of responsibility for a pullout that has been, by any reasonable measure, a debacle,” The Hill’s Niall Stanage explains. Any “idea that the final US operations were going to be seen as some kind of against-the-odds moral victory . . . vanished in the dust of” Thursday’s attacks. The prez might recover politically, but “the chaos of Kabul has left a taint of weakness and incompetence on the Biden White House that will not be erased soon, if at all.”

Afghan lessons: Two Decades of Failure

It’s not just Team Biden: The “experts have been getting it wrong on Afghanistan throughout this 20-year-long tragedy,” laments Spiked’s Tim Black, with “Western technocrats” creating a country “that bore little relation to the needs, attitudes and wishes of the people living there.” The “arrogance of the experts” reached “its grimly absurd apex under” President Barack Obama, who put “billions more in aid into the network of NGOs, private contractors and Kabul politicians building” the new Afghan state and announced US forces would leave in July 2011. But it was “an abject failure,” with Sen. Dianne Feinstein visiting and declaring the Taliban were stronger after Obama’s troop surge.

Foreign desk: Iran Wins in Taliban Triumph

By “allowing Iranian-sponsored Taliban groups not only to become a part of the new government of Afghanistan but help Tehran solve the problem that threatens it the most, the US has made Iran an immediate winner of the Taliban takeover,” fumes David Patrikarakos at Spectator World. Despite tension with the Taliban, Iran has “long sponsored various Taliban groups, particularly in the country’s southwest,” where the Helmand River supplies water to both nations. Experts think “it’s no coincidence that Zurang fell first during the Taliban advance,” with one saying, “Iran-sponsored Talibs took the city to take control of the water for Tehran.” Iran’s “chronic water problems” now “threaten the stability of the state. Years of water mismanagement” have caused shortages that provoked riots — and “scared” the regime. “You can terrorize people demanding civil rights off the streets, but if they are dying of thirst then a bullet won’t hold much fear.”

The Los Angeles Times building and newsroom
The Los Angeles Times had an op-ed titled “Larry Elder is the black face of white supremacy.”
Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Conservative: Blatant Bigotry in LA Times

Of a Los Angeles Times op-ed titled “Larry Elder is the black face of white supremacy,” Christopher Tremoglie asks at the Washington Examiner, “Why do leftists, liberals and Democrats get away with such blatant and unfiltered bigotry and discrimination?” Everyone has a right to disagree with another’s political views, but “it is no one’s right to use prejudice, bigotry and discrimination to do so.” Citizens should logically analyze and evaluate a candidate’s policies, not “resort to blatant racism to attempt to sway public opinion.” In future, “this type of racist and inflammatory rhetoric must be deemed unacceptable.” 

Eye on Germany: A Plague of Plagiarist Pols

“Meet the new scourge of German politicians: plagiarism hunters,” reports The Wall Street Journal’s Bojan Pancevski. “There is a fetish for titles” in Germany, where people “like being addressed as Herr Doctor and Frau Professor,” one “text detective” says, and so, Pancevski notes, “Ph.D.s are common among politicians.” Enter the “plagiarism sleuths, who command fees as high as 350 euros [$410] an hour” and are “usually hired by media outlets, commercial companies trying to recruit managers, universities or disgruntled employees.” Or political rivals. Chancellor Angela Merkel “lost three ministers — including one touted as a future chancellor — after they were exposed for copy-pasting parts of their doctoral theses.” And “two leading candidates” to succeed her in next month’s election — conservative Armin Laschet, the frontrunner, and Green Party head Annalena Baerbock — “saw their ratings drop after being exposed for copying parts of their books.” — Compiled by The Post Editorial Board



Source link

Recommended For You

About the Author: Election2020

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *